British Shorthair

Full of British reserve, the British Shorthair cat has a quiet voice and is an undemanding companion.

While not overly affectionate, the British Shorthair tends to get along just fine with everyone. They’re mellow and will tolerate other pets, and even though they may not seek out snuggles at every opportunity, they’re happy to be scooped up for a good cuddle.

While some cats get a reputation for being high-strung and jumpy, the British Shorthair is anything but. If you’re looking for a best buddy who stays calm as a cucumber and won’t do much pestering, this might just be the feline for you.

See all British Shorthair cat breed characteristics below!

Breed Characteristics

Some cat breeds are typically independent and aloof, even if they’ve been raised by the same person since kittenhood; others bond closely to one person and are indifferent to everyone else; and some shower the whole family with affection. Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; cats who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.

If you’re going to share your home with a cat, you’ll need to deal with some level of cat hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary among the breeds. If you’re a neatnik, you’ll need to either pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards. This furniture cover can make it easier to clean up cat hair and keep it off your sofa!

Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems. This doesn’t mean that every cat of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they’re at an increased risk. If you’re looking only for purebred cats or kittens, it’s a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you’re interested in.

Some cats are perpetual kittens—full of energy and mischief—while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful kitten sounds endearing, consider how many games of chase the mouse-toy you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other animals who can stand in as playmates. A classic wand cat toy like this one is perfect for playful felines!

Some breeds sound off more often than others with meows, yowls, and chattering. When choosing a breed, think about how the cat vocalizes and how often. If constant “conversation” drives you crazy, consider a kitty less likely to chat.

Being tolerant of children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a nonchalant attitude toward running, screaming youngsters are all traits that make a kid-friendly cat. Our ratings are generalizations, and they’re not a guarantee of how any breed or individual cat will behave; cats from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences and personality.

Stranger-friendly cats will greet guests with a curious glance or a playful approach; others are shy or indifferent, perhaps even hiding under furniture or skedaddling to another room. However, no matter what the breed, a cat who was exposed to lots of different types, ages, sizes, and shapes of people as a kitten will respond better to strangers as an adult.

Some breeds require very little in the way of grooming; others require regular brushing to stay clean and healthy. Consider whether you have the time and patience for a cat who needs daily brushing. You should definitely pick up this awesome de-shedding tool for cats of any hair length!

Some cat breeds are reputed to be smarter than others. But all cats, if deprived the mental stimulation they need, will make their own busy work. Interactive cat toys are a good way to give a cat a brain workout and keep them out of mischief. This scratcher cat toy can keep your smart kitty busy even when you’re not home!

Friendliness toward other household animals and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Some cats are more likely than others to be accepting of other pets in the home.

British Shorthair Cat Breed Pictures

Vital Stats

Life Span: 12 to 17 years
Length: 22 to 25 inches, not including tail
Weight: 7 to 17 pounds
Origin: Great Britain

More About This Breed

History

You may not realize it, but you probably grew up with the British Shorthair. He is the clever feline of Puss in Boots and the grinning Cheshire Cat of Alice in Wonderland.

The British Shorthair is native to England. With the rise of cat shows during the Victorian era, cat fanciers began to breed the cats to a particular standard and keep pedigrees for them. At the earliest cat shows, British Shorthairs were the only pedigreed cats exhibited. All others were simply described by coat type or color.

Two world wars devastated the breed, and few British Shorthairs remained after World War II. With the help of other breeds, the Shorthairs, as they are called in Britain, were revitalized.

The American Cat Association recognized the British Shorthair in 1967, but the Cat Fanciers Association did not accept it until 1980. Now, all cat associations recognize the breed.

Size

Males weight 12 to 20 pounds, females 8 to 14 pounds.

Personality

The British Shorthair is mellow and easygoing, making him an excellent family companion. He enjoys affection, but he’s not a “me, me, me” type of cat. Expect him to follow you around the house during the day, settling nearby wherever you stop.

Full of British reserve, the Shorthair has a quiet voice and is an undemanding companion. He doesn’t require a lap, although he loves to sit next to you. Being a big cat, he isn’t fond of being carried around.

This is a cat with a moderate activity level. He’s energetic during kittenhood, but usually starts to settle down by the time he is a year old. More mature British Shorthairs are usually couch potatoes, but adult males occasionally behave like goofballs. When they run through the house, they can sound like a herd of elephants.

British Shorthairs are rarely destructive; their manners are those of a proper governess, not a soccer hooligan. They welcome guests confidently.

Health

Both pedigreed cats and mixed-breed cats have varying incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. Problems that have been seen in the Shorthair are gingivitis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both of which can affect any breed.

Care

The British Shorthair’s short, smooth coat is simple to groom with weekly brushing or combing to remove dead hairs. A bath is rarely necessary.

Brush the teeth to prevent periodontal disease. Daily dental hygiene is best, but weekly brushing is better than nothing. Trim the nails weekly. Wipe the corners of the eyes with a soft, damp cloth to remove any discharge. Use a separate area of the cloth for each eye so you don’t run the risk of spreading any infection.

Check the ears weekly. If they look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball or soft damp cloth moistened with a 50-50 mixture of cider vinegar and warm water. Avoid using cotton swabs, which can damage the interior of the ear.

Keep the litter box spotlessly clean. Cats are very particular about bathroom hygiene.

It’s a good idea to keep a British Shorthair as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. British Shorthairs who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.

Coat Color And Grooming

With his short, thick coat, round head and cheeks, big round eyes, and rounded body, the British Shorthair resembles nothing so much as a cuddly teddy bear. His body is compact but powerful with a broad chest, strong legs with rounded paws and a thick tail with a rounded tip. The coat comes in just about any color or pattern you could wish for, including lilac, chocolate, black, white, pointed, tabby and many more. The best known color is blue (gray) and the cats are sometimes referred to as British Blues.

The shorthair does not reach full physical maturity until he is 3 to 5 years old.

Children And Other Pets

This mild-mannered cat is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect and is forgiving of clumsy toddlers. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him. Other cats will not disturb his equilibrium. For best results, always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

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